Greg Reads Books To You https://www.reformedpipes.com/category/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/ A podcast where Greg Reads Books to You… today, tommorow, or possibly the next day. Whenever you want a book read to you. Tue, 24 Apr 2018 19:28:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 https://i2.wp.com/www.reformedpipes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/cropped-The-Ragamuffins-mp3-image.jpg?fit=32%2C32&ssl=1 Greg Reads Books To You https://www.reformedpipes.com/category/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/ 32 32 In this podcast, Greg will read books to you. Today, Tomorrow or the Next Day. Whenever you want a book read to you... Greg will read it. Greg Enright clean episodic Greg Enright g.enright@ibcd.org g.enright@ibcd.org (Greg Enright) A Podcast where I read books to you. Greg Reads Books To You http://www.reformedpipes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Fundevogel-mp3-image.jpg https://www.reformedpipes.com/category/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/ g.enright@ibcd.org 144289926 Cupid’s Understudy Part 5 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/cupids-understudy-part-5/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/cupids-understudy-part-5/#respond Mon, 23 Apr 2018 13:00:03 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=1272 Continue reading "Cupid’s Understudy Part 5"

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Cupid’s Understudy Part 4 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/cupids-understudy-part-4/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/cupids-understudy-part-4/#respond Fri, 20 Apr 2018 13:00:24 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=1270 Continue reading "Cupid’s Understudy Part 4"

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Cupid’s Understudy Part 3 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/cupids-understudy-part-3/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/cupids-understudy-part-3/#respond Wed, 18 Apr 2018 13:00:54 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=1268 Continue reading "Cupid’s Understudy Part 3"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/cupids-understudy-part-3/feed/ 0 Chapter Five Our train left Grand Central Station at two o’clock next afternoon; it was bitter cold, I remember, and I drove to the station, smothered in furs. But our car was wonderfully cozy and comfortable, Our train left Grand Central Station at two o’clock next afternoon; it was bitter cold, I remember, and I drove to the station, smothered in furs. But our car was wonderfully cozy and comfortable, and it warmed my heart to see how proud Dad was of it: I must inspect the kitchen; this was my stateroom, did I like it? I mustn’t judge Amos by his appearance, but the way he could cook—he was a wonder at making griddle cakes. Did I still like griddle cakes? “And do look at the books and magazines Mr. Porter brought. And a box of chocolates, too. Wasn’t it kind of him?” Dear Dad! He was like a child with a new toy.
I’m sure he enjoyed every minute of the trip. Mr. Porter played cribbage with him (Dad adores cribbage) by the hour; they talked railroads, and politics, and mining—I don’t think Dad had been so happy in years. I know I had never been so happy, for I was sure Mr. Porter loved me. I couldn’t help being sure; his heart was in his eyes every time he looked at me.
When we started from New York, we were Mr. Middleton, and Mr. Porter, and Miss Middleton to one another; at Chicago, it was Tom, and Blakely, and Miss Middleton; I became Elizabeth in Utah (I made him call me that. And when we reached Nevada . . .
It happened so naturally, so sweetly. Dad was taking a nap after luncheon, and Blakely and I were sitting on the rear platform of our car, the last car in the train. It was a heavenly day of blue sky and sunshine; the desert was fresh from recent rain. And then a few, dear, faltered words changed the desert into a garden that reached to the rim of the world.
“I love you. I didn’t mean to tell you quite yet, but I . . . I . . .”
“I know. And it makes me so happy.”

You never saw anybody so delighted as Dad was when we told him. “This makes me glad clear through,” he said. “Blakely, boy, I couldn’t love you more if you were my own son. Elizabeth, girl, come and kiss your old Daddy.”
“And you aren’t surprised, Dad?”
“Not a bit.”
“He’s known I’ve loved you, all along. Haven’t you, Tom?”
“I may have suspected it.”
“But I’m sure he never dreamed I could possibly care for you,” I said. And then, because I was too happy to do anything else, I went to my state-room, and had a good cry.
I have read somewhere that Love would grow old were it not for the tears of happy women.
Chapter Six
When we flew down the grade into California, everything seemed settled; we were going to Santa Barbara where Dad was building a little palace for his Elizabeth as a grand surprise (Blakely’s mother was in Santa Barbara); we would take rooms at the same hotel; I would be presented to Mrs. Porter, and as soon as the palace on the hill was completed—a matter of two or three months—Blakely, and Dad, and I would move into it. Only, first, Blakely and I were going to San Bernardino on our wedding trip.
Wasn’t that sweet of Blakely? When I told him about San Bernardino, and the livery-stable, and the cottage where Dad and I used to live, he said he’d rather spend our honeymoon there than any place in the world. Of course Dad had never sold the cottage, and it was touching to see how pleased he was with our plan.
“You’ll find everything in first-class condition,” he said; “I go there often myself. I built a little house in one corner of the garden for the caretakers. You should see that gold-of-Ophir rose, Elizabeth; it has grown beyond belief.”
When we reached Oakland—where our car had to be switched off and attached to a coast line, train—we found we had four hours to kill, so Dad and Blakely and I (it was Blakely’s idea) caught the boat across to San Francisco.
What do you suppose that dear boy wanted us to go over there for? And where do you suppose he took us? He took us straight to Shreve’s, and he and Dad spent a beautiful two hours in choosing an engagement ring for me.]]>
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Cupid’s Understudy Part 2 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/cupids-understudy-part-2/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/cupids-understudy-part-2/#respond Mon, 16 Apr 2018 13:00:13 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=1266 Continue reading "Cupid’s Understudy Part 2"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/cupids-understudy-part-2/feed/ 0 Chapter Three The nice young man did more than find my missing trunks; he found a custom-house officer, and, after asking me privately which trunks contained my most valuable possessions and how much I had thought of declaring, The nice young man did more than find my missing trunks; he found a custom-house officer, and, after asking me privately which trunks contained my most valuable possessions and how much I had thought of declaring, he succeeded in having them passed through on my own valuation without any undue exposure of their contents.
By this time Dad had grown very respectful. To see his little Elizabeth treated like a queen, while on all sides angry women were having their best gowns pawed over and mussed; was a most wholesome lesson. He paid the thousand and odd dollars duty like a little man.
We’d been saved a lot of bother, and nobody hates a lot of bother more than Dad. So when the trunks were locked and strapped and ready to be sent to our hotel, Dad went up to the nice young man and said: “I’m Tom Middleton, from California, and this is my daughter Elizabeth. We’re both very grateful to you, and if you should ever happen to come to California, I hope you’ll look us up.”
That’s Dad all over!
I never saw anybody look so pleased as the young man: “My name’s Porter,” he said, “Blakely Porter. If my mother were in New York I would ask if she might call on Miss Middleton, but, as it happens, she’s in California, where I intend to join her, so I shall look forward to seeing you there.”
Then Dad did just the right thing. “What’s the use of waiting till we get to California?” he said. “Why not dine with us to-night!”
There are people, merely conventional people, who could never appreciate the fine directness and simplicity, of Dad’s nature—not if they lived to be a thousand years old. But Mr. Blakely Porter understood perfectly; I know he did, for he told me so afterwards. “It was the greatest compliment I ever had paid me in my life,” he said. “Your father knew nothing about me, absolutely nothing, yet he invited me to dine with him—and you. It was splendid, splendid!”
The dear boy didn’t know, perhaps, that honesty shone in his eyes, that one could not look at him and deny he was a gentleman. And, of course, I didn’t enlighten him, for it is well for men, particularly, young men, to feel grateful, and the least bit humble; it keeps them from being spoiled.
But to return to the dinner invitation: Mr. Porter accepted it eagerly. “It is more than kind of you,” he said. “My mother is away, and her house is closed. It is my first home-coming in four years, and I should have been lonely to-night.”
And poor Dad, who has been lonely—oh, so lonely!—ever since Ninette died, shook hands with him, and said: “If my daughter and I can keep you from feeling lonely, we shall be so. glad. We are stopping at The Plaza, and we dine at half past seven.”
Then Mr. Porter found us a taxi-cab, and away we went.
It was good to be in America again. I made Dad stop the car, and have the top put back, even though it was freezing cold, for I had never been in New York before (when I’d gone to France, I had sailed from New Orleans) and I wanted to see everything. The tall buildings, the elevated, even the bad paving till we got to Fifth Avenue, interested me immensely, as they would any one to whom. Paris had been home, and New York a foreign city. Not that I had ever thought of Paris as my real home; home was, where my heart was- -with Dad. I tried to make him understand how, happy I was to be with him, how I had missed him, and California.
“So you missed your old father; did you, girlie?”
“Yes, Dad.”
“And you’ll be glad to go to California?”
“Oh, so glad!”
“Then,” said Dad, “we’ll start tomorrow.”
Our rooms at the hotel were perfect; there was a bed room and bath for me a bed room and bath for Dad, with a sitting room between, all facing the Park. And there were roses everywhere; huge American Beauties, dear, wee, pink roses, roses of flaming red. I turned to Dad, who was standing in the middle of the sitting room, beaming at me.]]>
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Cupid’s Understudy Part 1 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/cupids-understudy-part-1/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/cupids-understudy-part-1/#respond Fri, 13 Apr 2018 13:00:53 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=1264 Continue reading "Cupid’s Understudy Part 1"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/cupids-understudy-part-1/feed/ 0 By Edward Salisbury Field Chapter One If Dad had been a coal baron, like Mr. Tudor Carstairs, or a stock- watering captain of industry, like Mrs. Sanderson-Spear’s husband, or descended from a long line of whisky distillers, like Mrs. Chapter One
If Dad had been a coal baron, like Mr. Tudor Carstairs, or a stock- watering captain of industry, like Mrs. Sanderson-Spear’s husband, or descended from a long line of whisky distillers, like Mrs. Carmichael Porter, why, then his little Elizabeth would have been allowed the to sit in seat of the scornful with the rest of the Four Hundred, and this story would never have been written. But Dad wasn’t any of these things; he was just an old love who had made seven million dollars by the luckiest fluke in the world.
Everybody in southern California knew it was a fluke, too, so the seven millions came in for all the respect that would otherwise have fallen to Dad. Of course we were celebrities, in a way, but in a very horrid way. Dad was Old Tom Middleton, who used to keep a livery-stable in San Bernardino, and I was Old Tom Middleton’s girl, “who actually used to live over a livery-stable, my dear!” It sounds fearfully sordid, doesn’t it?
But it wasn’t sordid, really, for I never actually lived over a stable. Indeed, we had the sweetest cottage in all San Bernardino. I remember it so well: the long, cool porch, the wonderful gold-of- Ophir roses, the honeysuckle where the linnets nested, the mocking birds that sang all night long; the perfume of the jasmine, of the orange-blossoms, the pink flame of the peach trees in April, the ever-changing color of the mountains. And I remember Ninette, my little Creole mother, gay as a butterfly, carefree as a meadow-lark. ’Twas she who planted the jasmine.
My little mother died when I was seven years old. Dad and I and my old black mammy, Rachel, stayed on in the cottage. The mocking-birds still sang, and the linnets still nested in the honeysuckle, but nothing was ever quite the same again. It was like a different world; it was a different world. There were gold-of-Ophir roses, and, peach blossoms in April, but there was no more jasmine; Dad had it all dug up. To this day he turns pale at the sight of it—poor Dad!
When I was twelve years old, Dad sold out his hardware business, intending to put his money in an orange grove at Riverside, but the nicest livery-stable in San Bernardino happened to be for sale just then, so he bought that instead, for he was always crazy about horses.
To see me trotting about in Paquin gowns and Doucet models, you’d never think I owed them to three owlish little burros, would you? But it’s a fact. When Dad took over the livery-stable, he found he was the proud possessor of three donkeys, as well as some twenty-odd horses, and a dozen or so buggies, buckboards and surries. The burros ate their solemn heads off all winter, but in May it had been the custom to send them to Strawberry Valley in charge of a Mexican who hired them out to the boarders at the summer hotel there. Luckily for us, when Fortune came stalking down the main street of San Bernardino to knock at the door of the Golden Eagle Stables, both dad and the burros were at home. If either had been out, we might be poor this very minute.
It is generally understood that when Fortune goes a-visiting, she goes disguised, so it’s small wonder Dad didn’t recognize her at first. She wasn’t even a “her”; she was a he, a great, awkward Swede with mouse-colored hair and a Yon Yonsen accent—you know the kind— slow to anger; slow to everything, without “j” in his alphabet—by the name of Olaf Knutsen.
Now Olaf was a dreamer. Not the conventional sort of a dreamer, who sees beauty in everything but an honest day’s work, but a brawny, pick-swinging dreamer who had dug holes in the ground at the end of many rainbows. That he had never yet uncovered the elusive pot of gold didn’t seem to bother him in the least; for him, that tender plant called Hope flowered perennially. And now he was bent on following another rainbow; a rainbow which; arching over the mountains, ended in that arid,]]>
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The Turnip https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-turnip/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-turnip/#respond Wed, 11 Apr 2018 13:00:17 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=1262 Continue reading "The Turnip"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-turnip/feed/ 0 Fairy Tales by The Brothers Grim There were two brothers who were both soldiers; the one was rich and the other poor. The poor man thought he would try to better himself; so, pulling off his red coat, he became a gardener, and dug his ground well, There were two brothers who were both soldiers; the one was rich and the other poor. The poor man thought he would try to better himself; so, pulling off his red coat, he became a gardener, and dug his ground well, and sowed turnips.
When the seed came up, there was one plant bigger than all the rest; and it kept getting larger and larger, and seemed as if it would never cease growing; so that it might have been called the prince of turnips for there never was such a one seen before, and never will again. At last it was so big that it filled a cart, and two oxen could hardly draw it; and the gardener knew not what in the world to do with it, nor whether it would be a blessing or a curse to him. One day he said to himself, ’What shall I do with it? if I sell it, it will bring no more than another; and for eating, the little turnips are better than this; the best thing perhaps is to carry it and give it to the king as a mark of respect.’
Then he yoked his oxen, and drew the turnip to the court, and gave it to the king. ’What a wonderful thing!’ said the king; ’I have seen many strange things, but such a monster as this I never saw. Where did you get the seed? or is it only your good luck? If so, you are a true child of fortune.’ ’Ah, no!’ answered the gardener, ’I am no child of fortune; I am a poor soldier, who never could get enough to live upon; so I laid aside my red coat, and set to work, tilling the ground. I have a brother, who is rich, and your majesty knows him well, and all the world knows him; but because I am poor, everybody forgets me.’
The king then took pity on him, and said, ’You shall be poor no longer. I will give you so much that you shall be even richer than your brother.’ Then he gave him gold and lands and flocks, and made him so rich that his brother’s fortune could not at all be compared with his.
When the brother heard of all this, and how a turnip had made the gardener so rich, he envied him sorely, and bethought himself how he could contrive to get the same good fortune for himself. However, he determined to manage more cleverly than his brother, and got together a rich present of gold and fine horses for the king; and thought he must have a much larger gift in return; for if his brother had received so much for only a turnip, what must his present be wroth?
The king took the gift very graciously, and said he knew not what to give in return more valuable and wonderful than the great turnip; so the soldier was forced to put it into a cart, and drag it home with him. When he reached home, he knew not upon whom to vent his rage and spite; and at length wicked thoughts came into his head, and he resolved to kill his brother.
So he hired some villains to murder him; and having shown them where to lie in ambush, he went to his brother, and said, ’Dear brother, I have found a hidden treasure; let us go and dig it up, and share it between us.’ The other had no suspicions of his roguery: so they went out together, and as they were travelling along, the murderers rushed out upon him, bound him, and were going to hang him on a tree.
But whilst they were getting all ready, they heard the trampling of a horse at a distance, which so frightened them that they pushed their prisoner neck and shoulders together into a sack, and swung him up by a cord to the tree, where they left him dangling, and ran away. Meantime he worked and worked away, till he made a hole large enough to put out his head.
When the horseman came up, he proved to be a student, a merry fellow, who was journeying along on his nag, and singing as he went. As soon as the man in the sack saw him passing under the tree, he cried out, ’Good morning! good morning to thee, my friend!’ The student looked about everywhere; and seeing no one, and not knowing where the voice came from, cried out, ’Who calls me?’
Then the man in the tree answered,]]>
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The Blue Light https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-blue-light/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-blue-light/#respond Mon, 09 Apr 2018 13:00:26 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=1260 Continue reading "The Blue Light"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-blue-light/feed/ 0 Fairy Tales by The Brothers Grim There was once upon a time a soldier who for many years had served the king faithfully, but when the war came to an end could serve no longer because of the many wounds which he had received. There was once upon a time a soldier who for many years had served the king faithfully, but when the war came to an end could serve no longer because of the many wounds which he had received. The king said to him: ’You may return to your home, I need you no longer, and you will not receive any more money, for he only receives wages who renders me service for them.’ Then the soldier did not know how to earn a living, went away greatly troubled, and walked the whole day, until in the evening he entered a forest. When darkness came on, he saw a light, which he went up to, and came to a house wherein lived a witch. ’Do give me one night’s lodging, and a little to eat and drink,’ said he to her, ’or I shall starve.’ ’Oho!’ she answered, ’who gives anything to a run-away soldier? Yet will I be compassionate, and take you in, if you will do what I wish.’ ’What do you wish?’ said the soldier. ’That you should dig all round my garden for me, tomorrow.’ The soldier consented, and next day laboured with all his strength, but could not finish it by the evening. ’I see well enough,’ said the witch, ’that you can do no more today, but I will keep you yet another night, in payment for which you must tomorrow chop me a load of wood, and chop it small.’ The soldier spent the whole day in doing it, and in the evening the witch proposed that he should stay one night more. ’Tomorrow, you shall only do me a very trifling piece of work. Behind my house, there is an old dry well, into which my light has fallen, it burns blue, and never goes out, and you shall bring it up again.’ Next day the old woman took him to the well, and let him down in a basket. He found the blue light, and made her a signal to draw him up again. She did draw him up, but when he came near the edge, she stretched down her hand and wanted to take the blue light away from him. ’No,’ said he, perceiving her evil intention, ’I will not give you the light until I am standing with both feet upon the ground.’ The witch fell into a passion, let him fall again into the well, and went away.
The poor soldier fell without injury on the moist ground, and the blue light went on burning, but of what use was that to him? He saw very well that he could not escape death. He sat for a while very sorrowfully, then suddenly he felt in his pocket and found his tobacco pipe, which was still half full. ’This shall be my last pleasure,’ thought he, pulled it out, lit it at the blue light and began to smoke. When the smoke had circled about the cavern, suddenly a little black dwarf stood before him, and said: ’Lord, what are your commands?’ ’What my commands are?’ replied the soldier, quite astonished. ’I must do everything you bid me,’ said the little man. ’Good,’ said the soldier; ’then in the first place help me out of this well.’ The little man took him by the hand, and led him through an underground passage, but he did not forget to take the blue light with him. On the way the dwarf showed him the treasures which the witch had collected and hidden there, and the soldier took as much gold as he could carry. When he was above, he said to the little man: ’Now go and bind the old witch, and carry her before the judge.’ In a short time she came by like the wind, riding on a wild tom-cat and screaming frightfully. Nor was it long before the little man reappeared. ’It is all done,’ said he, ’and the witch is already hanging on the gallows. What further commands has my lord?’ inquired the dwarf. ’At this moment, none,’ answered the soldier; ’you can return home, only be at hand immediately, if I summon you.’ ’Nothing more is needed than that you should light your pipe at the blue light, and I will appear before you at once.’ Thereupon he vanished from his sight.
The soldier returned to the town from which he come. He went to the best inn, ordered himself handsome clothes, and then bade the landlord furnish him a room as handsome as possible.]]>
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The Pink https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-pink/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-pink/#respond Fri, 06 Apr 2018 13:00:32 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=1257 Continue reading "The Pink"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-pink/feed/ 0 There was once upon a time a queen to whom God had given no children. Every morning she went into the garden and prayed to God in heaven to bestow on her a son or a daughter. Then an angel from heaven came to her and said: ’Be at rest, Every morning she went with the child to the garden where the wild beasts were kept, and washed herself there in a clear stream. It happened once when the child was a little older, that it was lying in her arms and she fell asleep. Then came the old cook, who knew that the child had the power of wishing, and stole it away, and he took a hen, and cut it in pieces, and dropped some of its blood on the queen’s apron and on her dress. Then he carried the child away to a secret place, where a nurse was obliged to suckle it, and he ran to the king and accused the queen of having allowed her child to be taken from her by the wild beasts. When the king saw the blood on her apron, he believed this, fell into such a passion that he ordered a high tower to be built, in which neither sun nor moon could be seen and had his wife put into it, and walled up. Here she was to stay for seven years without meat or drink, and die of hunger. But God sent two angels from heaven in the shape of white doves, which flew to her twice a day, and carried her food until the seven years were over.
The cook, however, thought to himself: ’If the child has the power of wishing, and I am here, he might very easily get me into trouble.’ So he left the palace and went to the boy, who was already big enough to speak, and said to him: ’Wish for a beautiful palace for yourself with a garden, and all else that pertains to it.’ Scarcely were the words out of the boy’s mouth, when everything was there that he had wished for. After a while the cook said to him: ’It is not well for you to be so alone, wish for a pretty girl as a companion.’ Then the king’s son wished for one, and she immediately stood before him, and was more beautiful than any painter could have painted her. The two played together, and loved each other with all their hearts, and the old cook went out hunting like a nobleman. The thought occurred to him, however, that the king’s son might some day wish to be with his father, and thus bring him into great peril. So he went out and took the maiden aside, and said: ’Tonight when the boy is asleep, go to his bed and plunge this knife into his heart, and bring me his heart and tongue, and if you do not do it, you shall lose your life.’ Thereupon he went away, and when he returned next day she had not done it, and said: ’Why should I shed the blood of an innocent boy who has never harmed anyone?’ The cook once more said: ’If you do not do it, it shall cost you your own life.’ When he had gone away, she had a little hind brought to her, and ordered her to be killed, and took her heart and tongue, and laid them on a plate, and when she saw the old man coming, she said to the boy: ’Lie down in your bed, and draw the clothes over you.’ Then the wicked wretch came in and said: ’Where are the boy’s heart and tongue?’ The girl reached the plate to him, but the king’s son threw off the quilt, and said: ’You old sinner, why did you want to kill me? Now will I pronounce thy sentence. You shall become a black poodle and have a gold collar round your neck, and shall eat burning coals, till the flames burst forth from your throat.’ And when he had spoken these words, the old man was changed into a poodle dog, and had a gold collar round his neck, and the cooks were ordered to bring up some live coals, and these he ate, until the flames broke forth from his throat. The king’s son remained there a short while longer, and he thought of his mother,]]>
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The Twelve Dancing Princesses https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-twelve-dancing-princesses/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-twelve-dancing-princesses/#respond Wed, 04 Apr 2018 13:00:29 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=947 Continue reading "The Twelve Dancing Princesses"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-twelve-dancing-princesses/feed/ 0 There was a king who had twelve beautiful daughters. They slept in twelve beds all in one room; and when they went to bed, the doors were shut and locked up; but every morning their shoes were found to be quite worn through as if they had been danced i... Then the king made it known to all the land, that if any person could discover the secret, and find out where it was that the princesses danced in the night, he should have the one he liked best for his wife, and should be king after his death; but whoever tried and did not succeed, after three days and nights, should be put to death.
A king’s son soon came. He was well entertained, and in the evening was taken to the chamber next to the one where the princesses lay in their twelve beds. There he was to sit and watch where they went to dance; and, in order that nothing might pass without his hearing it, the door of his chamber was left open. But the king’s son soon fell asleep; and when he awoke in the morning he found that the princesses had all been dancing, for the soles of their shoes were full of holes. The same thing happened the second and third night: so the king ordered his head to be cut off. After him came several others; but they had all the same luck, and all lost their lives in the same manner.
Now it chanced that an old soldier, who had been wounded in battle and could fight no longer, passed through the country where this king reigned: and as he was travelling through a wood, he met an old woman, who asked him where he was going. ’I hardly know where I am going, or what I had better do,’ said the soldier; ’but I think I should like very well to find out where it is that the princesses dance, and then in time I might be a king.’ ’Well,’ said the old dame, ’that is no very hard task: only take care not to drink any of the wine which one of the princesses will bring to you in the evening; and as soon as she leaves you pretend to be fast asleep.’
Then she gave him a cloak, and said, ’As soon as you put that on you will become invisible, and you will then be able to follow the princesses wherever they go.’ When the soldier heard all this good counsel, he determined to try his luck: so he went to the king, and said he was willing to undertake the task.
He was as well received as the others had been, and the king ordered fine royal robes to be given him; and when the evening came he was led to the outer chamber. Just as he was going to lie down, the eldest of the princesses brought him a cup of wine; but the soldier threw it all away secretly, taking care not to drink a drop. Then he laid himself down on his bed, and in a little while began to snore very loud as if he was fast asleep. When the twelve princesses heard this they laughed heartily; and the eldest said, ’This fellow too might have done a wiser thing than lose his life in this way!’ Then they rose up and opened their drawers and boxes, and took out all their fine clothes, and dressed themselves at the glass, and skipped about as if they were eager to begin dancing. But the youngest said, ’I don’t know how it is, while you are so happy I feel very uneasy; I am sure some mischance will befall us.’ ’You simpleton,’ said the eldest, ’you are always afraid; have you forgotten how many kings’ sons have already watched in vain? And as for this soldier, even if I had not given him his sleeping draught, he would have slept soundly enough.’
When they were all ready, they went and looked at the soldier; but he snored on, and did not stir hand or foot: so they thought they were quite safe; and the eldest went up to her own bed and clapped her hands, and the bed sank into the floor and a trap-door flew open. The soldier saw them going down through the trap-door one after another, the eldest leading the way; and thinking he had no time to lose, he jumped up,]]>
Greg Enright clean 9:03 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=947-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 947
The Juniper Tree – Part 2 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-juniper-tree-part-2/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-juniper-tree-part-2/#respond Mon, 02 Apr 2018 13:00:13 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=953 Continue reading "The Juniper Tree – Part 2"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-juniper-tree-part-2/feed/ 0 ’Bird,’ he said, ’how beautifully you sing! Sing me that song again.’ ’Nay,’ said the bird, ’I do not sing twice for nothing. Give that gold chain, and I will sing it you again.’ ’Here is the chain, take it,’ said the goldsmith. ’Nay,’ said the bird, ’I do not sing twice for nothing. Give that gold chain, and I will sing it you again.’
’Here is the chain, take it,’ said the goldsmith. ’Only sing me that again.’
The bird flew down and took the gold chain in his right claw, and then he alighted again in front of the goldsmith and sang:
’My mother killed her little son;
My father grieved when I was gone;
My sister loved me best of all;
She laid her kerchief over me,
And took my bones that they might lie
Underneath the juniper-tree
Kywitt, Kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I!’
Then he flew away, and settled on the roof of a shoemaker’s house and sang:
’My mother killed her little son;
My father grieved when I was gone;
My sister loved me best of all;
She laid her kerchief over me,
And took my bones that they might lie
Underneath the juniper-tree
Kywitt, Kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I!’
The shoemaker heard him, and he jumped up and ran out in his shirt- sleeves, and stood looking up at the bird on the roof with his hand over his eyes to keep himself from being blinded by the sun.
’Bird,’ he said, ’how beautifully you sing!’ Then he called through the door to his wife: ’Wife, come out; here is a bird, come and look at it and hear how beautifully it sings.’ Then he called his daughter and the children, then the apprentices, girls and boys, and they all ran up the street to look at the bird, and saw how splendid it was with its red and green feathers, and its neck like burnished gold, and eyes like two bright stars in its head.
’Bird,’ said the shoemaker, ’sing me that song again.’
’Nay,’ answered the bird, ’I do not sing twice for nothing; you must give me something.’
’Wife,’ said the man, ’go into the garret; on the upper shelf you will see a pair of red shoes; bring them to me.’ The wife went in and fetched the shoes.
’There, bird,’ said the shoemaker, ’now sing me that song again.’
The bird flew down and took the red shoes in his left claw, and then he went back to the roof and sang:
’My mother killed her little son;
My father grieved when I was gone;
My sister loved me best of all;
She laid her kerchief over me,
And took my bones that they might lie
Underneath the juniper-tree
Kywitt, Kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I!’
When he had finished, he flew away. He had the chain in his right claw and the shoes in his left, and he flew right away to a mill, and the mill went ’Click clack, click clack, click clack.’ Inside the mill were twenty of the miller’s men hewing a stone, and as they went ’Hick hack, hick hack, hick hack,’ the mill went ’Click clack, click clack, click clack.’
The bird settled on a lime-tree in front of the mill and sang:
’My mother killed her little son;
then one of the men left off,
My father grieved when I was gone;
two more men left off and listened,
My sister loved me best of all;
then four more left off,
She laid her kerchief over me,
And took my bones that they might lie
now there were only eight at work,
Underneath
And now only five,
the juniper-tree.
and now only one,
Kywitt, Kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I!’
then he looked up and the last one had left off work.
’Bird,’ he said, ’what a beautiful song that is you sing! Let me hear it too; sing it again.’
’Nay,’ answered the bird, ’I do not sing twice for nothing; give me that millstone, and I will sing it again.’
’If it belonged to me alone,’ said the man, ’you should have it.’
’Yes, yes,’ said the others: ’if he will sing again, he can have it.’
The bird came down, and all the twenty millers set to and lifted up the stone with a beam; then the bird put his head through the hole and t...]]>
Greg Enright clean 8:12 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=953-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 953
The Juniper Tree – Part 1 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-juniper-tree-part-1/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-juniper-tree-part-1/#respond Fri, 30 Mar 2018 13:00:16 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=951 Continue reading "The Juniper Tree – Part 1"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-juniper-tree-part-1/feed/ 0 The Juniper-Tree Long, long ago, some two thousand years or so, there lived a rich man with a good and beautiful wife. They loved each other dearly, but sorrowed much that they had no children. So greatly did they desire to have one, Long, long ago, some two thousand years or so, there lived a rich man with a good and beautiful wife. They loved each other dearly, but sorrowed much that they had no children. So greatly did they desire to have one, that the wife prayed for it day and night, but still they remained childless.
In front of the house there was a court, in which grew a juniper-tree. One winter’s day the wife stood under the tree to peel some apples, and as she was peeling them, she cut her finger, and the blood fell on the snow. ’Ah,’ sighed the woman heavily, ’if I had but a child, as red as blood and as white as snow,’ and as she spoke the words, her heart grew light within her, and it seemed to her that her wish was granted, and she returned to the house feeling glad and comforted. A month passed, and the snow had all disappeared; then another month went by, and all the earth was green. So the months followed one another, and first the trees budded in the woods, and soon the green branches grew thickly intertwined, and then the blossoms began to fall. Once again the wife stood under the juniper-tree, and it was so full of sweet scent that her heart leaped for joy, and she was so overcome with her happiness, that she fell on her knees. Presently the fruit became round and firm, and she was glad and at peace; but when they were fully ripe she picked the berries and ate eagerly of them, and then she grew sad and ill. A little while later she called her husband, and said to him, weeping. ’If I die, bury me under the juniper-tree.’ Then she felt comforted and happy again, and before another month had passed she had a little child, and when she saw that it was as white as snow and as red as blood, her joy was so great that she died.
Her husband buried her under the juniper-tree, and wept bitterly for her. By degrees, however, his sorrow grew less, and although at times he still grieved over his loss, he was able to go about as usual, and later on he married again.
He now had a little daughter born to him; the child of his first wife was a boy, who was as red as blood and as white as snow. The mother loved her daughter very much, and when she looked at her and then looked at the boy, it pierced her heart to think that he would always stand in the way of her own child, and she was continually thinking how she could get the whole of the property for her. This evil thought took possession of her more and more, and made her behave very unkindly to the boy. She drove him from place to place with cuffings and buffetings, so that the poor child went about in fear, and had no peace from the time he left school to the time he went back.
One day the little daughter came running to her mother in the store- room, and said, ’Mother, give me an apple.’ ’Yes, my child,’ said the wife, and she gave her a beautiful apple out of the chest; the chest had a very heavy lid and a large iron lock.
’Mother,’ said the little daughter again, ’may not brother have one too?’ The mother was angry at this, but she answered, ’Yes, when he comes out of school.’
Just then she looked out of the window and saw him coming, and it seemed as if an evil spirit entered into her, for she snatched the apple out of her little daughter’s hand, and said, ’You shall not have one before your brother.’ She threw the apple into the chest and shut it to. The little boy now came in, and the evil spirit in the wife made her say kindly to him, ’My son, will you have an apple?’ but she gave him a wicked look. ’Mother,’ said the boy, ’how dreadful you look! Yes, give me an apple.’ The thought came to her that she would kill him. ’Come with me,’ she said, and she lifted up the lid of the chest; ’take one out for yourself.’ And as he bent over to do so, the evil spirit urged her, and crash! down went the lid, and off went the little boy’s head. Then she was overwhelmed with fear at the thought of what she had done.]]>
Greg Enright clean 10:13 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=951-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 951
Clever Hans & Elsie – 2 Story Day https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/clever-hans-elsie-2-story-day/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/clever-hans-elsie-2-story-day/#respond Wed, 28 Mar 2018 13:00:47 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=949 Continue reading "Clever Hans & Elsie – 2 Story Day"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/clever-hans-elsie-2-story-day/feed/ 0 Clever Hans The mother of Hans said: ’Whither away, Hans?’ Hans answered: ’To Gretel.’ ’Behave well, Hans.’ ’Oh, I’ll behave well. Goodbye, mother.’ ’Goodbye, Hans.’ Hans comes to Gretel. ’Good day, Gretel.’ ’Good day, Hans. The mother of Hans said: ’Whither away, Hans?’ Hans answered: ’To Gretel.’ ’Behave well, Hans.’ ’Oh, I’ll behave well. Goodbye, mother.’ ’Goodbye, Hans.’ Hans comes to Gretel. ’Good day, Gretel.’ ’Good day, Hans. What do you bring that is good?’ ’I bring nothing, I want to have something given me.’ Gretel presents Hans with a needle, Hans says: ’Goodbye, Gretel.’ ’Goodbye, Hans.’
Hans takes the needle, sticks it into a hay-cart, and follows the cart home. ’Good evening, mother.’ ’Good evening, Hans. Where have you been?’ ’With Gretel.’ ’What did you take her?’ ’Took nothing; had something given me.’ ’What did Gretel give you?’ ’Gave me a needle.’ ’Where is the needle, Hans?’ ’Stuck in the hay-cart.’ ’That was ill done, Hans. You should have stuck the needle in your sleeve.’ ’Never mind, I’ll do better next time.’
’Whither away, Hans?’ ’To Gretel, mother.’ ’Behave well, Hans.’ ’Oh, I’ll behave well. Goodbye, mother.’ ’Goodbye, Hans.’ Hans comes to Gretel. ’Good day, Gretel.’ ’Good day, Hans. What do you bring that is good?’ ’I bring nothing. I want to have something given to me.’ Gretel presents Hans with a knife. ’Goodbye, Gretel.’ ’Goodbye, Hans.’ Hans takes the knife, sticks it in his sleeve, and goes home. ’Good evening, mother.’ ’Good evening, Hans. Where have you been?’ ’With Gretel.’ What did you take her?’ ’Took her nothing, she gave me something.’ ’What did Gretel give you?’ ’Gave me a knife.’ ’Where is the knife, Hans?’ ’Stuck in my sleeve.’ ’That’s ill done, Hans, you should have put the knife in your pocket.’ ’Never mind, will do better next time.’
’Whither away, Hans?’ ’To Gretel, mother.’ ’Behave well, Hans.’ ’Oh, I’ll behave well. Goodbye, mother.’ ’Goodbye, Hans.’ Hans comes to Gretel. ’Good day, Gretel.’ ’Good day, Hans. What good thing do you bring?’ ’I bring nothing, I want something given me.’ Gretel presents Hans with a young goat. ’Goodbye, Gretel.’ ’Goodbye, Hans.’ Hans takes the goat, ties its legs, and puts it in his pocket. When he gets home it is suffocated. ’Good evening, mother.’ ’Good evening, Hans. Where have you been?’ ’With Gretel.’ ’What did you take her?’ ’Took nothing, she gave me something.’ ’What did Gretel give you?’ ’She gave me a goat.’ ’Where is the goat, Hans?’ ’Put it in my pocket.’ ’That was ill done, Hans, you should have put a rope round the goat’s neck.’ ’Never mind, will do better next time.’
’Whither away, Hans?’ ’To Gretel, mother.’ ’Behave well, Hans.’ ’Oh, I’ll behave well. Goodbye, mother.’ ’Goodbye, Hans.’ Hans comes to Gretel. ’Good day, Gretel.’ ’Good day, Hans. What good thing do you bring?’ ’I bring nothing, I want something given me.’ Gretel presents Hans with a piece of bacon. ’Goodbye, Gretel.’ ’Goodbye, Hans.’
Hans takes the bacon, ties it to a rope, and drags it away behind him. The dogs come and devour the bacon. When he gets home, he has the rope in his hand, and there is no longer anything hanging on to it. ’Good evening, mother.’ ’Good evening, Hans. Where have you been?’ ’With Gretel.’ ’What did you take her?’ ’I took her nothing, she gave me something.’ ’What did Gretel give you?’ ’Gave me a bit of bacon.’ ’Where is the bacon, Hans?’ ’I tied it to a rope, brought it home, dogs took it.’ ’That was ill done, Hans, you should have carried the bacon on your head.’ ’Never mind, will do better next time.’
’Whither away, Hans?’ ’To Gretel, mother.’ ’Behave well, Hans.’ ’I’ll behave well. Goodbye, mother.’ ’Goodbye, Hans.’ Hans comes to Gretel. ’Good day, Gretel.’ ’Good day, Hans, What good thing do you bring?’ ’I bring nothing, but would have something given.’ Gretel presents Hans with a calf. ’Goodbye, Gretel.’ ’Goodbye, Hans.’
Hans takes the calf, puts it on his head, and the calf kicks his face. ’Good evening, mother.’ ’Good evening, Hans. Where have you been?’ ’With Gretel.’ ’What did you take her?’ ’I took nothing, but had something given me.’ ’What did Gretel give you?’ ’A calf.]]>
Greg Enright clean 14:00 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=949-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 949
Hans in Luck https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/hans-in-luck/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/hans-in-luck/#respond Mon, 26 Mar 2018 13:00:56 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=941 Continue reading "Hans in Luck"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/hans-in-luck/feed/ 0 Hans in Luck Some men are born to good luck: all they do or try to do comes right– all that falls to them is so much gain–all their geese are swans–all their cards are trumps–toss them which way you will, they will always, like poor puss, Some men are born to good luck: all they do or try to do comes right– all that falls to them is so much gain–all their geese are swans–all their cards are trumps–toss them which way you will, they will always, like poor puss, alight upon their legs, and only move on so much the faster. The world may very likely not always think of them as they think of themselves, but what care they for the world? what can it know about the matter?
One of these lucky beings was neighbour Hans. Seven long years he had worked hard for his master. At last he said, ’Master, my time is up; I must go home and see my poor mother once more: so pray pay me my wages and let me go.’ And the master said, ’You have been a faithful and good servant, Hans, so your pay shall be handsome.’ Then he gave him a lump of silver as big as his head.
Hans took out his pocket-handkerchief, put the piece of silver into it, threw it over his shoulder, and jogged off on his road homewards. As he went lazily on, dragging one foot after another, a man came in sight, trotting gaily along on a capital horse. ’Ah!’ said Hans aloud, ’what a fine thing it is to ride on horseback! There he sits as easy and happy as if he was at home, in the chair by his fireside; he trips against no stones, saves shoe-leather, and gets on he hardly knows how.’ Hans did not speak so softly but the horseman heard it all, and said, ’Well, friend, why do you go on foot then?’ ’Ah!’ said he, ’I have this load to carry: to be sure it is silver, but it is so heavy that I can’t hold up my head, and you must know it hurts my shoulder sadly.’ ’What do you say of making an exchange?’ said the horseman. ’I will give you my horse, and you shall give me the silver; which will save you a great deal of trouble in carrying such a heavy load about with you.’ ’With all my heart,’ said Hans: ’but as you are so kind to me, I must tell you one thing–you will have a weary task to draw that silver about with you.’ However, the horseman got off, took the silver, helped Hans up, gave him the bridle into one hand and the whip into the other, and said, ’When you want to go very fast, smack your lips loudly together, and cry “Jip!”’
Hans was delighted as he sat on the horse, drew himself up, squared his elbows, turned out his toes, cracked his whip, and rode merrily off, one minute whistling a merry tune, and another singing,
’No care and no sorrow,  A fig for the morrow!  We’ll laugh and be merry,  Sing neigh down derry!’
After a time he thought he should like to go a little faster, so he smacked his lips and cried ’Jip!’ Away went the horse full gallop; and before Hans knew what he was about, he was thrown off, and lay on his back by the road-side. His horse would have ran off, if a shepherd who was coming by, driving a cow, had not stopped it. Hans soon came to himself, and got upon his legs again, sadly vexed, and said to the shepherd, ’This riding is no joke, when a man has the luck to get upon a beast like this that stumbles and flings him off as if it would break his neck. However, I’m off now once for all: I like your cow now a great deal better than this smart beast that played me this trick, and has spoiled my best coat, you see, in this puddle; which, by the by, smells not very like a nosegay. One can walk along at one’s leisure behind that cow–keep good company, and have milk, butter, and cheese, every day, into the bargain. What would I give to have such a prize!’ ’Well,’ said the shepherd, ’if you are so fond of her, I will change my cow for your horse; I like to do good to my neighbours, even though I lose by it myself.’ ’Done!’ said Hans, merrily. ’What a noble heart that good man has!’ thought he. Then the shepherd jumped upon the horse, wished Hans and the cow good morning, and away he rode.
Hans brushed his coat, wiped his face and hands, rested a while, and then drove off his cow quietly, and thought his bargain a very lucky one.]]>
Greg Enright clean 13:45 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=941-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 941
Rumpelstiltskin https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/rumpelstiltskin/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/rumpelstiltskin/#respond Fri, 23 Mar 2018 13:00:49 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=939 Continue reading "Rumpelstiltskin"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/rumpelstiltskin/feed/ 0 By the side of a wood, in a country a long way off, ran a fine stream of water; and upon the stream there stood a mill. The miller’s house was close by, and the miller, you must know, had a very beautiful daughter. She was, moreover, She sat down in one corner of the room, and began to bewail her hard fate; when on a sudden the door opened, and a droll-looking little man hobbled in, and said, ’Good morrow to you, my good lass; what are you weeping for?’ ’Alas!’ said she, ’I must spin this straw into gold, and I know not how.’ ’What will you give me,’ said the hobgoblin, ’to do it for you?’ ’My necklace,’ replied the maiden. He took her at her word, and sat himself down to the wheel, and whistled and sang:
’Round about, round about,    Lo and behold!  Reel away, reel away,    Straw into gold!’
And round about the wheel went merrily; the work was quickly done, and the straw was all spun into gold.
When the king came and saw this, he was greatly astonished and pleased; but his heart grew still more greedy of gain, and he shut up the poor miller’s daughter again with a fresh task. Then she knew not what to do, and sat down once more to weep; but the dwarf soon opened the door, and said, ’What will you give me to do your task?’ ’The ring on my finger,’ said she. So her little friend took the ring, and began to work at the wheel again, and whistled and sang:
’Round about, round about,    Lo and behold!  Reel away, reel away,    Straw into gold!’
till, long before morning, all was done again.
The king was greatly delighted to see all this glittering treasure; but still he had not enough: so he took the miller’s daughter to a yet larger heap, and said, ’All this must be spun tonight; and if it is, you shall be my queen.’ As soon as she was alone that dwarf came in, and said, ’What will you give me to spin gold for you this third time?’ ’I have nothing left,’ said she. ’Then say you will give me,’ said the little man, ’the first little child that you may have when you are queen.’ ’That may never be,’ thought the miller’s daughter: and as she knew no other way to get her task done, she said she would do what he asked. Round went the wheel again to the old song, and the manikin once more spun the heap into gold. The king came in the morning, and, finding all he wanted, was forced to keep his word; so he married the miller’s daughter, and she really became queen.
At the birth of her first little child she was very glad, and forgot the dwarf, and what she had said. But one day he came into her room, where she was sitting playing with her baby, and put her in mind of it. Then she grieved sorely at her misfortune, and said she would give him all the wealth of the kingdom if he would let her off, but in vain; till at last her tears softened him, and he said, ’I will give you three days’ grace, and if during that time you tell me my name, you shall keep your child.’
Now the queen lay awake all night, thinking of all the odd names that she had ever heard; and she sent messengers all over the land to find out new ones. The next day the little man came, and she began with TIMOTHY, ICHABOD, BENJAMIN, JEREMIAH, and all the names she could remember; but to all and eac...]]>
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The Robber Bridegroom https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-robber-bridegroom/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-robber-bridegroom/#respond Wed, 21 Mar 2018 13:00:38 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=937 Continue reading "The Robber Bridegroom"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/the-robber-bridegroom/feed/ 0 There was once a miller who had one beautiful daughter, and as she was grown up, he was anxious that she should be well married and provided for. He said to himself, ’I will give her to the first suitable man who comes and asks for her hand. When Sunday came, and it was time for the girl to start, a feeling of dread came over her which she could not explain, and that she might be able to find her path again, she filled her pockets with peas and lentils to sprinkle on the ground as she went along. On reaching the entrance to the forest she found the path strewed with ashes, and these she followed, throwing down some peas on either side of her at every step she took. She walked the whole day until she came to the deepest, darkest part of the forest. There she saw a lonely house, looking so grim and mysterious, that it did not please her at all. She stepped inside, but not a soul was to be seen, and a great silence reigned throughout. Suddenly a voice cried:
’Turn back, turn back, young maiden fair,  Linger not in this murderers’ lair.’
The girl looked up and saw that the voice came from a bird hanging in a cage on the wall. Again it cried:
’Turn back, turn back, young maiden fair,  Linger not in this murderers’ lair.’
The girl passed on, going from room to room of the house, but they were all empty, and still she saw no one. At last she came to the cellar, and there sat a very, very old woman, who could not keep her head from shaking. ’Can you tell me,’ asked the girl, ’if my betrothed husband lives here?’
’Ah, you poor child,’ answered the old woman, ’what a place for you to come to! This is a murderers’ den. You think yourself a promised bride, and that your marriage will soon take place, but it is with death that you will keep your marriage feast. Look, do you see that large cauldron of water which I am obliged to keep on the fire! As soon as they have you in their power they will kill you without mercy, and cook and eat you, for they are eaters of men. If I did not take pity on you and save you, you would be lost.’
Thereupon the old woman led her behind a large cask, which quite hid her from view. ’Keep as still as a mouse,’ she said; ’do not move or speak, or it will be all over with you. Tonight, when the robbers are all asleep, we will flee together. I have long been waiting for an opportunity to escape.’
The words were hardly out of her mouth when the godless crew returned, dragging another young girl along with them. They were all drunk, and paid no heed to her cries and lamentations. They gave her wine to drink, three glasses full, one of white wine, one of red, and one of yellow, and with that her heart gave way and she died. Then they tore of her dainty clothing, laid her on a table, and cut her beautiful body into pieces, and sprinkled salt upon it.
The poor betrothed girl crouched trembling and shuddering behind the cask, for she saw what a terrible fate had been intended for her by the robbers. One of them now noticed a gold ring still remaining on the little finger of the murdered girl,]]>
Greg Enright clean 9:02 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=937-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 937
My Wife’s Tempter – Part 3 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/my-wifes-tempter-part-3/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/my-wifes-tempter-part-3/#respond Mon, 19 Mar 2018 13:00:27 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=694 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/my-wifes-tempter-part-3/feed/ 0 Greg Enright clean 9:27 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=694-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 694 My Wife’s Tempter – Part 2 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/my-wifes-tempter-part-2/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/my-wifes-tempter-part-2/#respond Fri, 16 Mar 2018 13:00:37 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=692 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/my-wifes-tempter-part-2/feed/ 0 Greg Enright clean 9:27 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=692-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 692 My Wife’s Tempter – Part 1 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/my-wifes-tempter-part-1/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/my-wifes-tempter-part-1/#respond Wed, 14 Mar 2018 13:00:47 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=690 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/my-wifes-tempter-part-1/feed/ 0 Greg Enright clean 11:27 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=690-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 690 By The Waters of Paradise – Part 6 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/by-the-waters-of-paradise-part-6/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/by-the-waters-of-paradise-part-6/#respond Mon, 12 Mar 2018 13:00:54 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=688 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/by-the-waters-of-paradise-part-6/feed/ 0 Greg Enright clean 9:38 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=688-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 688 By The Waters of Paradise – Part 5 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/by-the-waters-of-paradise-part-5/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/by-the-waters-of-paradise-part-5/#respond Fri, 09 Mar 2018 14:00:58 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=686 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/by-the-waters-of-paradise-part-5/feed/ 0 Greg Enright clean 10:45 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=686-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 686 By The Waters of Paradise – Part 4 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/by-the-waters-of-paradise-part-4/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/by-the-waters-of-paradise-part-4/#respond Wed, 07 Mar 2018 14:00:13 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=684 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/by-the-waters-of-paradise-part-4/feed/ 0 Greg Enright clean 11:43 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=684-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 684 By The Waters of Paradise – Part 3 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/by-the-waters-of-paradise-part-3/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/by-the-waters-of-paradise-part-3/#respond Mon, 05 Mar 2018 14:00:37 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=682 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/by-the-waters-of-paradise-part-3/feed/ 0 Greg Enright clean 11:09 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=682-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 682 By The Waters of Paradise – Part 2 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/by-the-waters-of-paradise-part-2/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/by-the-waters-of-paradise-part-2/#respond Fri, 02 Mar 2018 14:00:05 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=680 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/by-the-waters-of-paradise-part-2/feed/ 0 Greg Enright clean 10:34 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=680-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 680 By The Waters of Paradise – Part 1 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/by-the-waters-of-paradise-part-1/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/by-the-waters-of-paradise-part-1/#respond Wed, 28 Feb 2018 21:12:29 +0000 https://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=678 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/by-the-waters-of-paradise-part-1/feed/ 0 Greg Enright clean 11:04 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=678-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 678 Episode 16 | The Black Poodle – Part 8 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-16-the-black-poodle-part-8/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-16-the-black-poodle-part-8/#respond Mon, 26 Feb 2018 14:00:35 +0000 http://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=529 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-16-the-black-poodle-part-8/feed/ 0 Greg Enright clean 9:40 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=529-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 529 Episode 15 | The Black Poodle – Part 7 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-15-the-black-poodle-part-7/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-15-the-black-poodle-part-7/#respond Fri, 23 Feb 2018 14:00:34 +0000 http://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=527 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-15-the-black-poodle-part-7/feed/ 0 Greg Enright clean 6:12 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=527-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 527 Episode 14 | The Black Poodle – Part 6 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-14-the-black-poodle-part-6/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-14-the-black-poodle-part-6/#respond Wed, 21 Feb 2018 14:00:31 +0000 http://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=525 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-14-the-black-poodle-part-6/feed/ 0 Greg Enright clean 8:33 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=525-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 525 Episode 13 | The Black Poodle – Part 5 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-13-the-black-poodle-part-5/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-13-the-black-poodle-part-5/#respond Mon, 19 Feb 2018 14:00:29 +0000 http://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=523 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-13-the-black-poodle-part-5/feed/ 0 Greg Enright clean 10:34 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=523-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 523 Episode 12 | The Black Poodle – Part 4 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-12-the-black-poodle-part-4/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-12-the-black-poodle-part-4/#respond Fri, 16 Feb 2018 14:00:26 +0000 http://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=521 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-12-the-black-poodle-part-4/feed/ 0 Greg Enright clean 10:49 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=521-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 521 Episode 11 | The Black Poodle – Part 3 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-11-the-black-poodle-part-3/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-11-the-black-poodle-part-3/#respond Wed, 14 Feb 2018 14:00:25 +0000 http://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=519 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-11-the-black-poodle-part-3/feed/ 0 Greg Enright clean 11:18 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=519-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 519 Episode 10 | The Black Poodle – Part 2 https://www.reformedpipes.com/uncategorized/episode-10-the-black-poodle-part-2/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/uncategorized/episode-10-the-black-poodle-part-2/#respond Mon, 12 Feb 2018 14:00:20 +0000 http://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=517 https://www.reformedpipes.com/uncategorized/episode-10-the-black-poodle-part-2/feed/ 0 Greg Enright clean 7:44 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=517-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 517 Episode 9 | The Black Poodle – Part 1 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-9-the-black-poodle-part-1/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-9-the-black-poodle-part-1/#respond Fri, 09 Feb 2018 14:00:19 +0000 http://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=515 https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-9-the-black-poodle-part-1/feed/ 0 Greg Enright clean 10:27 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=515-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 515 Episode 8 | The Old Man and His Grandson | The Fox and the Cat https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-8-the-old-man-and-his-grandson-the-fox-and-the-cat/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-8-the-old-man-and-his-grandson-the-fox-and-the-cat/#respond Wed, 07 Feb 2018 14:31:20 +0000 http://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=471 Continue reading "Episode 8 | The Old Man and His Grandson | The Fox and the Cat"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-8-the-old-man-and-his-grandson-the-fox-and-the-cat/feed/ 0 The Old Man and His Grandson There was once a very old man, whose eyes had become dim, his ears dull of hearing, his knees trembled, and when he sat at table he could hardly hold the spoon, and spilt the broth upon the table-cloth or let it run out of ... There was once a very old man, whose eyes had become dim, his ears dull of hearing, his knees trembled, and when he sat at table he could hardly hold the spoon, and spilt the broth upon the table-cloth or let it run out of his mouth. His son and his son’s wife were disgusted at this, so the old grandfather at last had to sit in the corner behind the stove, and they gave him his food in an earthenware bowl, and not even enough of it. And he used to look towards the table with his eyes full of tears. Once, too, his trembling hands could not hold the bowl, and it fell to the ground and broke. The young wife scolded him, but he said nothing and only sighed. Then they brought him a wooden bowl for a few half-pence, out of which he had to eat.
They were once sitting thus when the little grandson of four years old began to gather together some bits of wood upon the ground. ’What are you doing there?’ asked the father. ’I am making a little trough,’ answered the child, ’for father and mother to eat out of when I am big.’
The man and his wife looked at each other for a while, and presently began to cry. Then they took the old grandfather to the table, and henceforth always let him eat with them, and likewise said nothing if he did spill a little of anything.
The Fox and the Cat
It happened that the cat met the fox in a forest, and as she thought to herself: ’He is clever and full of experience, and much esteemed in the world,’ she spoke to him in a friendly way. ’Good day, dear Mr Fox, how are you? How is all with you? How are you getting on in these hard times?’ The fox, full of all kinds of arrogance, looked at the cat from head to foot, and for a long time did not know whether he would give any answer or not. At last he said: ’Oh, you wretched beard-cleaner, you piebald fool, you hungry mouse-hunter, what can you be thinking of? Have you the cheek to ask how I am getting on? What have you learnt? How many arts do you understand?’ ’I understand but one,’ replied the cat, modestly. ’What art is that?’ asked the fox. ’When the hounds are following me, I can spring into a tree and save myself.’ ’Is that all?’ said the fox. ’I am master of a hundred arts, and have into the bargain a sackful of cunning. You make me sorry for you; come with me, I will teach you how people get away from the hounds.’ Just then came a hunter with four dogs. The cat sprang nimbly up a tree, and sat down at the top of it, where the branches and foliage quite concealed her. ’Open your sack, Mr Fox, open your sack,’ cried the cat to him, but the dogs had already seized him, and were holding him fast. ’Ah, Mr Fox,’ cried the cat. ’You with your hundred arts are left in the lurch! Had you been able to climb like me, you would not have lost your life.’
Greg Reads This eBook of “Fairy Tales” by the Grimm Brothers (based on translations from the Grimms’ Kinder und Hausmärchen by Edgar Taylor and Edgar Taylor and Marian Edwardes) to you. Complete book.

Authorama – Classic Literature, free of copyrightAbout…
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Greg Enright clean 4:40 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=471-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 471
Episode 7 | The Miser in the Bush https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-7-the-miser-in-the-bush/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-7-the-miser-in-the-bush/#respond Mon, 05 Feb 2018 14:31:19 +0000 http://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=469 Continue reading "Episode 7 | The Miser in the Bush"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-7-the-miser-in-the-bush/feed/ 0 A farmer had a faithful and diligent servant, who had worked hard for him three years, without having been paid any wages. At last it came into the man’s head that he would not go on thus without pay any longer; so he went to his master, and said, The farmer was a sad miser, and knew that his man was very simple-hearted; so he took out threepence, and gave him for every year’s service a penny. The poor fellow thought it was a great deal of money to have, and said to himself, ’Why should I work hard, and live here on bad fare any longer? I can now travel into the wide world, and make myself merry.’ With that he put his money into his purse, and set out, roaming over hill and valley.
As he jogged along over the fields, singing and dancing, a little dwarf met him, and asked him what made him so merry. ’Why, what should make me down-hearted?’ said he; ’I am sound in health and rich in purse, what should I care for? I have saved up my three years’ earnings and have it all safe in my pocket.’ ’How much may it come to?’ said the little man. ’Full threepence,’ replied the countryman. ’I wish you would give them to me,’ said the other; ’I am very poor.’
Then the man pitied him, and gave him all he had; and the little dwarf said in return, ’As you have such a kind honest heart, I will grant you three wishes–one for every penny; so choose whatever you like.’ Then the countryman rejoiced at his good luck, and said, ’I like many things better than money: first, I will have a bow that will bring down everything I shoot at; secondly, a fiddle that will set everyone dancing that hears me play upon it; and thirdly, I should like that everyone should grant what I ask.’ The dwarf said he should have his three wishes; so he gave him the bow and fiddle, and went his way.
Our honest friend journeyed on his way too; and if he was merry before, he was now ten times more so. He had not gone far before he met an old miser: close by them stood a tree, and on the topmost twig sat a thrush singing away most joyfully. ’Oh, what a pretty bird!’ said the miser; ’I would give a great deal of money to have such a one.’ ’If that’s all,’ said the countryman, ’I will soon bring it down.’
Then he took up his bow, and down fell the thrush into the bushes at the foot of the tree. The miser crept into the bush to find it; but directly he had got into the middle, his companion took up his fiddle and played away, and the miser began to dance and spring about, capering higher and higher in the air. The thorns soon began to tear his clothes till they all hung in rags about him, and he himself was all scratched and wounded, so that the blood ran down.
’Oh, for heaven’s sake!’ cried the miser, ’Master! master! pray let the fiddle alone. What have I done to deserve this?’ ’Thou hast shaved many a poor soul close enough,’ said the other; ’thou art only meeting thy reward’: so he played up another tune. Then the miser began to beg and promise, and offered money for his liberty; but he did not come up to the musician’s price for some time, and he danced him along brisker and brisker, and the miser bid higher and higher, till at last he offered a round hundred of florins that he had in his purse, and had just gained by cheating some poor fellow. When the countryman saw so much money, he said, ’I will agree to your proposal.’ So he took the purse, put up his fiddle, and travelled on very pleased with his bargain.
Meanwhile the miser crept out of the bush half-naked and in a piteous plight, and began to ponder how he should take his revenge, and serve his late companion some trick. At last he went to the judge, and complained that a rascal had robbed him of his money, and beaten him into the bargain; and that the fellow who did it carried a bow at his back and a fiddle hung round his neck.]]>
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Episode 6 | The Queen Bee https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-6-the-queen-bee/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-6-the-queen-bee/#respond Thu, 01 Feb 2018 14:31:18 +0000 http://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=467 Continue reading "Episode 6 | The Queen Bee"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-6-the-queen-bee/feed/ 0 Two kings’ sons once upon a time went into the world to seek their fortunes; but they soon fell into a wasteful foolish way of living, so that they could not return home again. Then their brother, who was a little insignificant dwarf, Then their brother, who was a little insignificant dwarf, went out to seek for his brothers: but when he had found them they only laughed at him, to think that he, who was so young and simple, should try to travel through the world, when they, who were so much wiser, had been unable to get on.
However, they all set out on their journey together, and came at last to an ant- hill. The two elder brothers would have pulled it down, in order to see how the poor ants in their fright would run about and carry off their eggs. But the little dwarf said, ’Let the poor things enjoy themselves, I will not suffer you to trouble them.’
So on they went, and came to a lake where many many ducks were swimming about. The two brothers wanted to catch two, and roast them.
But the dwarf said, ’Let the poor things enjoy themselves, you shall not kill them.’
Next they came to a bees’-nest in a hollow tree, and there was so much honey that it ran down the trunk; and the two brothers wanted to light a fire under the tree and kill the bees, so as to get their honey.
But the dwarf held them back, and said, ’Let the pretty insects enjoy themselves, I cannot let you burn them.’
At length the three brothers came to a castle: and as they passed by the stables they saw fine horses standing there, but all were of marble, and no man was to be seen. Then they went through all the rooms, till they came to a door on which were three locks: but in the middle of the door was a wicket, so that they could look into the next room. There they saw a little grey old man sitting at a table; and they called to him once or twice, but he did not hear: however, they called a third time, and then he rose and came out to them.
He said nothing, but took hold of them and led them to a beautiful table covered with all sorts of good things: and when they had eaten and drunk, he showed each of them to a bed-chamber.
The next morning he came to the eldest and took him to a marble table, where there were three tablets, containing an account of the means by which the castle might be disenchanted.
The first tablet said: ’In the wood, under the moss, lie the thousand pearls belonging to the king’s daughter; they must all be found: and if one be missing by set of sun, he who seeks them will be turned into marble.’
The eldest brother set out, and sought for the pearls the whole day: but the evening came, and he had not found the first hundred: so he was turned into stone as the tablet had foretold.
The next day the second brother undertook the task; but he succeeded no better than the first; for he could only find the second hundred of the pearls; and therefore he too was turned into stone.
At last came the little dwarf’s turn; and he looked in the moss; but it was so hard to find the pearls, and the job was so tiresome!–so he sat down upon a stone and cried. And as he sat there, the king of the ants (whose life he had saved) came to help him, with five thousand ants; and it was not long before they had found all the pearls and laid them in a heap.
The second tablet said: ’The key of the princess’s bed-chamber must be fished up out of the lake.’ And as the dwarf came to the brink of it, he saw the two ducks whose lives he had saved swimming about; and they dived down and soon brought in the key from the bottom.
The third task was the hardest. It was to choose out the youngest and the best of the king’s three daughters. Now they were all beautiful, and all exactly alike: but he was told that the eldest had eaten a piece of sugar, the next some sweet syrup, and the youngest a spoonful of honey; so he was to guess which it was that had eaten the honey.
Then came the queen of the bees,]]>
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Episode 5 | The Four Clever Brothers https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-5-the-four-clever-brothers/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-5-the-four-clever-brothers/#respond Mon, 29 Jan 2018 22:37:04 +0000 http://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=465 Continue reading "Episode 5 | The Four Clever Brothers"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-5-the-four-clever-brothers/feed/ 0 ’Dear children,’ said a poor man to his four sons, ’I have nothing to give you; you must go out into the wide world and try your luck. Begin by learning some craft or another, and see how you can get on.’ So the four brothers took their walking-sticks ... ’I have nothing to give you; you must go out into the wide world and try your luck. Begin by learning some craft or another, and see how you can get on.’
So the four brothers took their walking-sticks in their hands, and their little bundles on their shoulders, and after bidding their father goodbye, went all out at the gate together. When they had got on some way they came to four crossways, each leading to a different country.
Then the eldest said, ’Here we must part; but this day four years we will come back to this spot, and in the meantime each must try what he can do for himself.’
 
So each brother went his way; and as the eldest was hastening on a man met him, and asked him where he was going, and what he wanted. ’I am going to try my luck in the world, and should like to begin by learning some art or trade,’ answered he.
’Then,’ said the man, ’go with me, and I will teach you to become the cunningest thief that ever was.’
’No,’ said the other, ’that is not an honest calling, and what can one look to earn by it in the end but the gallows?’
’Oh!’ said the man, ’you need not fear the gallows; for I will only teach you to steal what will be fair game: I meddle with nothing but what no one else can get or care anything about, and where no one can find you out.’
So the young man agreed to follow his trade, and he soon showed himself so clever, that nothing could escape him that he had once set his mind upon.
 
The second brother also met a man, who, when he found out what he was setting out upon, asked him what craft he meant to follow. ’I do not know yet,’ said he.
’Then come with me, and be a star-gazer. It is a noble art, for nothing can be hidden from you, when once you understand the stars.’
The plan pleased him much, and he soon became such a skilful star-gazer, that when he had served out his time, and wanted to leave his master, he gave him a glass, and said, ’With this you can see all that is passing in the sky and on earth, and nothing can be hidden from you.’
 
The third brother met a huntsman, who took him with him, and taught him so well all that belonged to hunting, that he became very clever in the craft of the woods; and when he left his master he gave him a bow, and said, ’Whatever you shoot at with this bow you will be sure to hit.’
 
The youngest brother likewise met a man who asked him what he wished to do. ’Would not you like,’ said he, ’to be a tailor?’
’Oh, no!’ said the young man; ’sitting cross-legged from morning to night, working backwards and forwards with a needle and goose, will never suit me.’
’Oh!’ answered the man, ’that is not my sort of tailoring; come with me, and you will learn quite another kind of craft from that.’
Not knowing what better to do, he came into the plan, and learnt tailoring from the beginning; and when he left his master, he gave him a needle, and said, ’You can sew anything with this, be it as soft as an egg or as hard as steel; and the joint will be so fine that no seam will be seen.’
 
After the space of four years, at the time agreed upon, the four brothers met at the four cross-roads; and having welcomed each other, set off towards their father’s home, where they told him all that had happened to them, and how each had learned some craft.
 
Then, one day, as they were sitting before the house under a very high tree, the father said, ’I should like to try what each of you can do in this way.’
So he looked up, and said to the second son, ’At the top of this tree there is a chaffinch’s nest; tell me how many eggs there are in it.’ The star-gazer took his glass, looked up, and said, ’Five.’
’Now,’ said the father to the eldest son, ’take away the eggs without letting the bird that is sitting upon them and hatching them know anything of...]]>
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Episode 4 | Fundevogel https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-4-fundevogel/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-4-fundevogel/#respond Mon, 02 Oct 2017 16:00:10 +0000 http://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=452 Continue reading "Episode 4 | Fundevogel"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-4-fundevogel/feed/ 0 There was once a forester who went into the forest to hunt, and as he entered it he heard a sound of screaming as if a little child were there. He followed the sound, and at last came to a high tree, and at the top of this a little child was sitting, The forester climbed up, brought the child down, and thought to himself: ’You will take him home with you, and bring him up with your Lina.’ He took it home, therefore, and the two children grew up together. And the one, which he had found on a tree was called Fundevogel, because a bird had carried it away. Fundevogel and Lina loved each other so dearly that when they did not see each other they were sad.
Now the forester had an old cook, who one evening took two pails and began to fetch water, and did not go once only, but many times, out to the spring. Lina saw this and said, ’Listen, old Sanna, why are you fetching so much water?’ ’If you will never repeat it to anyone, I will tell you why.’ So Lina said, no, she would never repeat it to anyone, and then the cook said: ’Early tomorrow morning, when the forester is out hunting, I will heat the water, and when it is boiling in the kettle, I will throw in Fundevogel, and will boil him in it.’
Early next morning the forester got up and went out hunting, and when he was gone the children were still in bed. Then Lina said to Fundevogel: ’If you will never leave me, I too will never leave you.’ Fundevogel said: ’Neither now, nor ever will I leave you.’ Then said Lina: ’Then will I tell you. Last night, old Sanna carried so many buckets of water into the house that I asked her why she was doing that, and she said that if I would promise not to tell anyone, and she said that early tomorrow morning when father was out hunting, she would set the kettle full of water, throw you into it and boil you; but we will get up quickly, dress ourselves, and go away together.’
The two children therefore got up, dressed themselves quickly, and went away. When the water in the kettle was boiling, the cook went into the bedroom to fetch Fundevogel and throw him into it. But when she came in, and went to the beds, both the children were gone. Then she was terribly alarmed, and she said to herself: ’What shall I say now when the forester comes home and sees that the children are gone? They must be followed instantly to get them back again.’
Then the cook sent three servants after them, who were to run and overtake the children. The children, however, were sitting outside the forest, and when they saw from afar the three servants running, Lina said to Fundevogel: ’Never leave me, and I will never leave you.’ Fundevogel said: ’Neither now, nor ever.’ Then said Lina: ’Do you become a rose-tree, and I the rose upon it.’ When the three servants came to the forest, nothing was there but a rose-tree and one rose on it, but the children were nowhere. Then said they: ’There is nothing to be done here,’ and they went home and told the cook that they had seen nothing in the forest but a little rose-bush with one rose on it. Then the old cook scolded and said: ’You simpletons, you should have cut the rose-bush in two, and have broken off the rose and brought it home with you; go, and do it at once.’ They had therefore to go out and look for the second time. The children, however, saw them coming from a distance. Then Lina said: ’Fundevogel, never leave me, and I will never leave you.’ Fundevogel said: ’Neither now; nor ever.’ Said Lina: ’Then do you become a church, and I’ll be the chandelier in it.’ So when the three servants came, nothing was there but a church, with a chandelier in it. They said therefore to each other: ’What can we do here, let us go home.’ When they got home, the cook asked if they had not found them; so they said no,]]>
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Episode 3 | The Straw, The Coal and The Bean https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-3-the-straw-the-coal-and-the-bean/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-3-the-straw-the-coal-and-the-bean/#respond Fri, 29 Sep 2017 16:00:51 +0000 http://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=450 Continue reading "Episode 3 | The Straw, The Coal and The Bean"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-3-the-straw-the-coal-and-the-bean/feed/ 0 In a village dwelt a poor old woman, who had gathered together a dish of beans and wanted to cook them. So she made a fire on her hearth, and that it might burn the quicker, she lighted it with a handful of straw. ’But what are we to do now?’ said the coal.
’I think,’ answered the bean, ’that as we have so fortunately escaped death, we should keep together like good companions, and lest a new mischance should overtake us here, we should go away together, and repair to a foreign country.’
The proposition pleased the two others, and they set out on their way together. Soon, however, they came to a little brook, and as there was no bridge or foot-plank, they did not know how they were to get over it. The straw hit on a good idea, and said: ’I will lay myself straight across, and then you can walk over on me as on a bridge.’ The straw therefore stretched itself from one bank to the other, and the coal, who was of an impetuous disposition, tripped quite boldly on to the newly-built bridge. But when she had reached the middle, and heard the water rushing beneath her, she was after all, afraid, and stood still, and ventured no farther. The straw, however, began to burn, broke in two pieces, and fell into the stream. The coal slipped after her, hissed when she got into the water, and breathed her last. The bean, who had prudently stayed behind on the shore, could not but laugh at the event, was unable to stop, and laughed so heartily that she burst. It would have been all over with her, likewise, if, by good fortune, a tailor who was travelling in search of work, had not sat down to rest by the brook. As he had a compassionate heart he pulled out his needle and thread, and sewed her together. The bean thanked him most prettily, but as the tailor used black thread, all beans since then have a black seam.
Greg Reads This eBook of “Fairy Tales” by the Grimm Brothers (based on translations from the Grimms’ Kinder und Hausmärchen by Edgar Taylor and Edgar Taylor and Marian Edwardes) to you. Complete book.

Authorama – Classic Literature, free of copyrightAbout…
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Episode 2 | The Fisherman and His Wife https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-2-the-fisherman-and-his-wife/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-2-the-fisherman-and-his-wife/#respond Wed, 27 Sep 2017 20:42:08 +0000 http://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=448 Continue reading "Episode 2 | The Fisherman and His Wife"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-2-the-fisherman-and-his-wife/feed/ 0 There was once a fisherman who lived with his wife in a pigsty, close by the seaside. The fisherman used to go out all day long a-fishing; and one day, as he sat on the shore with his rod, looking at the sparkling waves and watching his line, When the fisherman went home to his wife in the pigsty, he told her how he had caught a great fish, and how it had told him it was an enchanted prince, and how, on hearing it speak, he had let it go again. ’Did not you ask it for anything?’ said the wife, ’we live very wretchedly here, in this nasty dirty pigsty; do go back and tell the fish we want a snug little cottage.’
The fisherman did not much like the business: however, he went to the seashore; and when he came back there the water looked all yellow and green. And he stood at the water’s edge, and said:
’O man of the sea!
Hearken to me!
My wife Ilsabill
Will have her own will,
And hath sent me to beg a boon of thee!’
Then the fish came swimming to him, and said, ’Well, what is her will? What does your wife want?’ ’Ah!’ said the fisherman, ’she says that when I had caught you, I ought to have asked you for something before I let you go; she does not like living any longer in the pigsty, and wants a snug little cottage.’ ’Go home, then,’ said the fish; ’she is in the cottage already!’ So the man went home, and saw his wife standing at the door of a nice trim little cottage. ’Come in, come in!’ said she; ’is not this much better than the filthy pigsty we had?’ And there was a parlour, and a bedchamber, and a kitchen; and behind the cottage there was a little garden, planted with all sorts of flowers and fruits; and there was a courtyard behind, full of ducks and chickens. ’Ah!’ said the fisherman, ’how happily we shall live now!’ ’We will try to do so, at least,’ said his wife.
Everything went right for a week or two, and then Dame Ilsabill said, ’Husband, there is not near room enough for us in this cottage; the courtyard and the garden are a great deal too small; I should like to have a large stone castle to live in: go to the fish again and tell him to give us a castle.’ ’Wife,’ said the fisherman, ’I don’t like to go to him again, for perhaps he will be angry; we ought to be easy with this pretty cottage to live in.’ ’Nonsense!’ said the wife; ’he will do it very willingly, I know; go along and try!’
The fisherman went, but his heart was very heavy: and when he came to the sea, it looked blue and gloomy, though it was very calm; and he went close to the edge of the waves, and said:
’O man of the sea!
Hearken to me!
My wife Ilsabill
Will have her own will,
And hath sent me to beg a boon of thee!’
’Well, what does she want now?’ said the fish. ’Ah!’ said the man, dolefully, ’my wife wants to live in a stone castle.’ ’Go home, then,’ said the fish; ’she is standing at the gate of it already.’ So away went the fisherman, and found his wife standing before the gate of a great castle. ’See,’ said she, ’is not this grand?’ With that they went into the castle together, and found a great many servants there, and the rooms all richly furnished, and full of golden chairs and tables; and behind the castle was a garden, and around it was a park half a mile long, full of sheep, and goats, and hares, and deer; and in the courtyard were stables and cow-houses. ’Well,]]>
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Episode 1 | The Ragamuffins https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-1-the-ragamuffins/ https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-1-the-ragamuffins/#respond Tue, 26 Sep 2017 21:49:29 +0000 http://www.reformedpipes.com/?p=444 Continue reading "Episode 1 | The Ragamuffins"

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https://www.reformedpipes.com/greg-reads-books-to-you-podcast/episode-1-the-ragamuffins/feed/ 0 THE cock once said to the hen, “It is now the time when our nuts are ripe, so let us go to the hill together and for once eat our fill before the squirrel takes them all away.” “Yes,” replied the hen, “come, we will have some pleasure together. As they were thus disputing, a duck quacked to them, “You thieving folks, who bade you go to my nut-hill? Well, you shall suffer for it!” and ran with open beak at the cock. But the cock also was not idle, and fell boldly on the duck, and at last wounded her so with his spurs that she also begged for mercy, and willingly let herself be harnessed to the carriage as a punishment. The little cock now seated himself on the box and was coachman, and thereupon they went off in a gallop, with “Duck, go as fast as thou canst.” When they had driven a part of the way they met two foot-passengers, a pin and a needle. They cried, “Stop! stop!” and said that it would soon be as dark as pitch, and then they could not go a step further, and that it was so dirty on the road, and asked if they could not get into the carriage for a while. They had been at the tailor’s public- house by the gate, and had stayed too long over the beer. As they were thin people, who did not take up much room, the cock let them both get in, but they had to promise him and his little hen not to step on their feet. Late in the evening they came to an inn, and as they did not like to go further by night, and as the duck also was not strong on her feet, and fell from one side to the other, they went in. The host at first made many objections, his house was already full, besides he thought they could not be very distinguished persons; but at last, as they made pleasant speeches, and told him that he should have the egg which the little hen has laid on the way, and should likewise keep the duck, which laid one every day, he at length said that they might stay the night. And now they had themselves well served, and feasted and rioted. Early in the morning, when day was breaking, and every one was asleep, the cock awoke the hen, brought the egg, pecked it open, and they ate it together, but they threw the shell on the hearth. Then they went to the needle which was still asleep, took it by the head and stuck it into the cushion of the landlord’s chair, and put the pin in his towel, and at the last without more ado they flew away over the heath. The duck who liked to sleep in the open air and had stayed in the yard, heard them going away, made herself merry and found a stream, down which she swam, which was a much quicker way of travelling than being harnessed to a carriage. The host did not get out of bed for two hours after this; he washed himself and wanted to dry himself, then the pin went over his face and made a red streak from one ear to the other. After this he went into the kitchen and wanted to light a pipe, but when he came to the hearth the egg-shell darted into his eyes. “This morning everything attacks my head, ” said he, and angrily sat down on his grandfather’s chair, but he quickly started up again and cried, “Woe is me, ” for the needle had pricked him still worse than the pin, and not in the head. Now he was thoroughly angry,]]> Greg Enright clean 5:14 <iframe width="320" height="30" src="https://www.reformedpipes.com/?powerpress_embed=444-podcast&amp;powerpress_player=mediaelement-audio" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> 444